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The largest port in the Baltic Sea is now open

Photo: Stockholms Hamnar

​Photo: Stockholms Hamnar

​Värtahamnen is the number one passenger port in Sweden and the Baltic Sea. The port, which is more than one hundred years old, is under construction to become the new gateway to Stockholm. Two berths are now open and operating.

When Port of Stockholm has finished the reconstruction, Värtahamnen will meet the needs of modern vessels and have a modern passenger terminal accessible to the general public with restaurants and views overlooking the bay. The reconstruction of the Swedish port will obtain a new quay length of 1,200 meters. The port provides five new berthing facilities where two quay-berths are ready to operate.

Decreasing the traffic – increasing the tourism

Not only is the port reconstructed, also the traffic going to and from Värtahamnen is being improved. The neighbouring areas will be spared from the massive traffic pressure they are currently under. Once the port is completed, it will loosen the traffic and create more flow in the surrounding infrastructure.

Värthamnen is paving the way for Stockholm to be a world-class seafaring city, and it opens up for more cruise ships arriving in Stockholm. This will have a positive impact on the industry of tourism.

Due to the reconstruction of the port, Stockholm is expanding with a total area of 131,000 square meters, making room for a residential buildings and commercial centres. These square meters are of high value, since the Stockholm region is increasing by 35,000 people every year.

 

By Ida Friis

Published 17.11.2015

Facts about the project

​COWI has been responsible for all detailed design works and drawn on the company's high expertise within the field of marine structures. Detailed design of port and berth is one of the tasks, another is the paved surface, and yet another is the electrical channelisation of the area.

Find the project sheet here

LAST UPDATED: 04.10.2017