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COWI supervises major African highway project

Photo: COWI

​​​A major african highway project connects Dar es Salaam with the landlocked countries of Zambia and Malawi and Democratic Republic of Congo.

Last month, COWI finished supervising the reconstruction of the last segment of a 218 km section, which is part of the 921 km long Tanzam highway.

The Tanzam highway connects Dar es Salaam with the landlocked countries of Zambia and Malawi, as well as the Democratic Republic of Congo.

 
COWI's involvement started in 2005 when we prepared the detailed design and tender documents. The works contract was won by Danish contractor Aarsleff in joint venture with Interbeton from the Netherlands (now BAM, another Dutch contractor). Work started on the first 150 km section in August 2008, but was extended to cover the full 218 km in 2011.

 
“The Tanzam highway has definitely been one of the biggest highway projects for COWI in Africa, and it had its share of challenges. The main road from the Tanzam highway to the city of Iringa was very difficult. It is a quite narrow stretch of road on a very steep hill, and it had to have the capacity to sustain heavy traffic,” says Jan Holm Pedersen, Project Director, Railways, Roads and Airports.

 

Improving safety


 
The design incorporates traffic safety facilities in built-up areas, like traffic calming measures and separated service roads. A large number of climbing lanes were constructed on the steeper rural section of the highway to enhance safe overtaking and provide smoother driving conditions for smaller vehicles.

 
“The safety along the highway has been greatly improved because of a large number of new safety measures, which should reduce the number of accidents significantly,” says Holm Pedersen.

 
COWI has previously also designed and supervised the reconstruction of two other sections of the Tanzam highway, both in Tanzania: the 65 km from Dar es Salaam to Mlandizi in Tanzania, and the 130 km between Chalinze and Melela.

 

LAST UPDATED: 16.09.2016